Bart Currie, FRACP

Professor, Menzies School of Health Research and Head of the Royal Darwin Hospital Infectious Diseases Department
Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

Dr. Currie currently serves as Professor, Menzies School of Health Research and Head of the Royal Darwin Hospital Infectious Diseases Department, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. Dr. Currie runs the Darwin Prospective Melioidosis Study, now in its 25th year. Since 2000 he has been Professor in Medicine at the Northern Territory Medical Program, Flinders University and he is Adjunct Professorial Fellow, Charles Darwin University. Dr. Currie’s passion is in coordinating links between clinicians, public health colleagues and other service providers, laboratory scientists and community. The research Dr. Currie has been involved in has targeted improving prevention and treatment of specific illnesses usually through a better understanding of the underlying disease processes, including an emphasis on melioidosis. Dr. Currie received his Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

David AB Dance, MB, ChB, MSc, FRCPath

Consultant Microbiologist for the Lao-Oxford-Mahosot-Wellcome Trust Research Unit, Microbiology Laboratory, Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Lao PDR Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, UK, and Public Health England
Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Dr. Dance serves as Consultant Microbiologist for the Lao-Oxford-Mahosot-Wellcome Trust Research Unit (LOMWRU), Microbiology Laboratory, Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Lao PDR Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, UK, and Public Health England. Dr. Dance currently works on bacterial infections of importance to public health in Laos. He has had a particular interest in all aspects of melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) dating back to 1986 when he helped to initiate prospective studies of the disease in Ubon Ratchathani, north east Thailand, especially gaining a greater understanding of the global distribution of the disease and the environmental factors that underpin its distribution. Dr. Dance received his medical degree from the University of Bristol, UK and his MSc in clinical microbiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Direk Limmathurotsakul, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand; Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit
Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Limmathurotsatokal currently serves as Assistant Professor, Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand; Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU), Bangkok, Thailand. Dr. Limmathurotsatokal’s primary clinical area of expertise is in melioidosis, leptospirosis and ricketsiosis with a specific emphasis on research methodology, epidemiology and statistics, including Bayesian data analysis. He was a key committee member of the World Melioidosis Congress of 2013 and one of the foremost authorities on endemic melioidosis. Dr. Limmathurotsakul received his MD from Chulalongkorn University, Thailand and his PhD from Open University, UK.

W. Joost Wiersinga, MD, PhD

Post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Infection and Immunity and the Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine and consultant at the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam
The Netherlands

Dr. Wiersinga serves as a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CINIMA) and the Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine (CEMM) and as consultant at the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In addition to his infectious disease practice, Dr. Wiersinga’s research interests are in host-pathogen interactions and innate immune responses in infectious diseases, including sepsis. His PhD and ongoing work is particularly focused on Burkholderia pseudomallei. Dr. Wiersinga received his MD from the University of Amsterdam and his PhD from the University of Amsterdam.